Grocery News: Recycling What Can’t Be Recycled

[ 5 ] May 29, 2009 |

by Katy Killilea

e-or-d-eatingYogurt and hummus are two of the main food groups for lots of young families, and typically these foods are  packaged in #5 plastics. Number fives aren’t yet recyclable in Rhode Island, so after you’ve reused your containers as paint-mixing receptacles or bathtub cups, they’re usually landfill-bound.

storagebowls1Relief is in sight for environmentally concerned parents of  yogurt munchers. Preserve is a company that needs your #5 plastics–to make toothbrushes, razors, and colanders, and nifty green storage bowls. Participating Whole Foods stores act as collection sites on behalf of Preserve, including both Providence locations and the Cranston store.

For more information, read all about it here!

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Category: environment, food + recipes


Katy Killilea

about the author ()

Katy Killilea lives in Barrington with her husband, their sons (2001 + 2003), and a dog named Grover. Katy loves reading, cooking, loud pants, the Beehive in Bristol, and learning everything she can about Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease. She says more about that at Bigfoot Child Have Diabetes.

Comments (5)

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  1. Maria says:

    great info, Katy!

  2. Sally says:

    Thanks for the reminder, Katy! Kudos to WF for acting as the third party collection site.

  3. calendar katharine says:

    the bowls are just right–perfect for the last portion of fruit salad or whatever you’re bringing for lunch, and they’re very sturdy and dishwasher-safe.

  4. erin goodman says:

    such a big step in the right direction!!!

  5. D says:

    So here’s a link to the PDF document about what you CAN recycle in Rhode Island: http://www.rirrc.org/documents/RIRR-4645%20recycling%20FA.pdf

    Full website with info: http://www.rirrc.org/main.cfm?sec_id=17&guid=d44e9702-b799-40e7-90d3-60a6ba24d8d6

    This morning I was wondering why our blue bin was throw into our bushes with a few of the #6 strawberry containers throw on our porch? Was it a message for the “recycling engineers” trying to explain what’s acceptable. Seems like throwing the bin isn’t the most clear message, but who knows, at least they didn’t waste a pamphlet explaining.

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