How to Have Your Own Bag System

[ 1 ] May 7, 2013 |

Managing everyday life can be overwhelming at times. It’s a constant struggle keeping up with our own, let alone keeping track of our children’s lives as well.  Every activity requires “stuff.” The only system that has helped me (or my kids) not to forget the “stuff” is the bag system. Created purely by accident but greatly needed, over time I have developed my homemade bag system to sort the chaos. And it doesn’t hurt that I love bags and collect them from all over.

bagsIt starts with a handful of bags–canvas bags, grocery store bags, shopping bags, and bags that were given to my husband at golf tournaments–then assign an activity that we do, to each bag. When children are little, our job as parents is to organize the bags but as they get older the kids take on the responsibility of keeping the bags filled.

What’s in the bags? Anything that the activity requires. The lacrosse bag carries the stick, mouthguard, extra socks, water bottle and extra hair elastics. Seasonal bags stay tucked away until that season returns. The summer bag has towels, sunscreen, hats, magazines, lip balm, goggles, and the favorite floating ball. My winter bag has skates, hats, mittens, helmets, lip balm, a small towel to wipe the skates and extra socks. Although bags need to be updated each season (as kids may outgrow an item) they come in handy when the season seems to creep up on our busy routines. I like not spending my whole day searching for winter items when the first skating invitation comes our way.

Over the years, I remember bags of all the other activities that have come and gone: my work bag, diaper bag, girl scout bag, and yoga bag. This system helps me from forgetting anything, as long as, I remember to refill and add items as needed.

Good luck setting the bag system and let me know how it goes!

Category: baby, kids, new parents, organization, preschool, teens (13 +), Tips for New Parents, tweens


Chrissy Collins

about the author ()

Chrissy Collins is a Parent Coach with a private practice in The Rumford Center in Rhode Island. She offers non-judgemental support and education for parents with children ages birth to 5-years-old. Her philosophy is that happy and confident parents have the strongest influence in raising well-adjusted children. In addition to one-on-one support, Chrissy offers workshops for groups of parents, schools and daycares. 

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  1. How to Have Your Own Bag System | Chrissy Collins | August 26, 2013

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