Celebrate Spring with Pea Tendrils

[ 0 ] April 2, 2013 |

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March 20th has come and gone which means that spring is officially here! Perhaps you’re playing one of our favorite games, “Signs of Spring,” noticing the small ways in which the season of blossoming and new growth are popping up all around us? The crocus bloomed, the days are growing longer, and it’s just about time to plant seeds for the first crops of the season.

Speaking of produce and farms, one of the most delightful greens of the season will be making its debut soon—the young tendrils of the sweet pea plant. If you haven’t tried these greens yet, we can’t recommend them enough! They are delicate and full of flavor, perfect for making a crunchy and fun-to-eat salad for lunch or dinner.

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Pea_Tendril_Salad_Recipe-webTo keep the focus on the pea tendrils, we turn to this recipe for dressing the greens with oranges and feta cheese every spring. Most kids like this dish because of the sweetness of the orange segments and the unusual twirling tendrils of the pea shoots. And if you have a cheese lover in your family, the feta adds a perfect dash of salty creamy flavor.

As always, half the fun is in the preparation of the dish and giving little chefs at home a job to do. In this recipe, kids can crumble the feta, wash the greens, and help mix up the dressing. The dish works best if you arrange the orange segments and feta cheese on top of each serving and this creates a perfect opportunity to artfully arrange the cheese and oranges into an attractive composition.

If pea tendrils aren’t yet available, you can make this dish with baby spinach, spring mix, or any other tender green you’d eat raw in a salad. Just click on the image to download the recipe, print it out, and enjoy it at the dinner table in the ultimate celebration of spring!

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Category: food + recipes, high school age, kids, preschool, teens (13 +), tweens


Leah Kent

about the author ()

Leah Cherry teaches children and their families how to cook, sew, make and grow – traditional talents that remain essential for living well today. Her business, Skill It, is founded on the belief that working with your hands nourishes your spirit and connects you to family and community. In addition to after-school and community events in Rhode Island, Skill It offers an online class, Season’s Eatings, to create joy, fun, and connection around food and family dinnertime. You can read the Skill It blog (www.skillitri.com) and sign-up for the newsletter to receive class updates.

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