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Why, Thank You

People love handwritten letters and bemoan their scarcity. Thank goodness part of our population is still cranking out handwritten letters in significant quantities: the birthday girls and boys. Our children are keeping the handwritten letter alive with their scrawly stacks of thank you notes.

At our house, this ritual is never painless. Even with fresh Sharpies and Wallace & Gromit foldover notes, it’s not much fun.

People love handwritten letters and bemoan their scarcity. Thank goodness part of our population is still cranking out handwritten letters in significant quantities: the birthday girls and boys. Our children are keeping the handwritten letter alive with their scrawly stacks of thank you notes.

At our house, this ritual is never painless. Even with fresh Sharpies and Wallace & Gromit foldover notes, it’s not much fun. (Although pads of 40 are available at Ocean State Job Lot for $1.) How about Star Wars? Surely Darth Vader will brighten the letter writer’s mood. But no. For my kids, writing thank you notes on Star Wars stationery is like making a Kaopectate sandwich on Seven Stars bread. Until this week, nothing made the task of writing thank you notes any less disgusting.

This week we got some new stationery. KnockKnock pads for kids feature the same kinds of checkbox and fill-in-the-blank forms as their adult products. (Such as the D-bag Citation or the much kinder High Five note: “You made toast.”) The pads for kids are slightly more earnest but still fun and funny. And they do, miraculously, make letter writing less painful.

And so we are now using the Hi There pad when handwritten communications are in order. It starts “Dear______” and can go in several directions from there. (“Hi,” or “Thank you,” or “Sorry” or “_______.”) This might remind you of the great scene in Diary of a Wimpy Kid wherein the protagonist designs his own fill-in-the-blank style thank you cards. They work well up to a point, but the system quickly breaks down: “Thank you so much for the PANTS. My friends will be so jealous that I have my very own PANTS.” This will not happen with the Hi There pad. The genius copywriters and designers at KnockKnock give a child enough blank space and flexibility to get any message across gracefully.

For all involved, it’s a winner. The reluctant writer gets just enough of an epistolary head start to feel like he’s getting away with something, the recipient gets a handwritten letter that’s more than a robotic “Thank you for the present. Love, Lily,” and the parent gets 40 sheets and 60 assorted stickers for eight bucks. Also available in formats for book reports, sharing feelings, and creating imaginary characters.

Details
KnockKnock
Pads are 6 x 9 inches. Each has 40 sheets, 60 stickers featuring 5 designs, and a cotton ribbon hanger
Cost: $8

Editors note: KnockKnock sent samples for our consideration. Kidoinfo never accepts payment for reviews.

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