Your guide to parenting in Rhode Island and southeastern Massachusetts

Make your mark at the Museum of Art Rhode Island School of Design, as the popular Big Draw returns for its third-annual FREE celebration of drawing on Saturday, April 28, 2012, from 11 am to 4 pm.

“Artist Henri Matisse is quoted as saying ‘Drawing is putting a line around an idea,’” says Aja Blanc, Associate Educator at the RISD Museum of Art. “I love this because it expresses the notion that drawing is a means of thinking through ideas and sharing them with others.”

Draw through the Museum in artist-led activities for all ages, spontaneous mark making in the galleries, and special demonstrations by RISD student-artists. Let live music guide your hand; contribute to a large-scale mural; make a drawing, take a drawing in the always popular Drawing Exchange; see artists at work in the galleries; and draw across time and culture using the Museum’s new Young Explorer’s Guide. There’ll be no starving artists here... venture out into the Chace Center Plaza and visit Rosie’s food truck for family-friendly lunch and snack options.

Blanc says that the Big Draw gives Museum visitors the opportunity to take pleasure in the act of drawing and see the practice of drawing in new ways–as a way of looking closely at a work of art, for example, or as a means of communicating ideas.

SCHEDULE OF FREE EVENTS

11 am-4 pm
Celebrate drawing in all its forms at the third-annual Big Draw, Saturday, April 28, at the RISD Museum of Art.

11:30 am-1:30 pm + 2-3:30 pm

Details:

The RISD Museum of Art
Entrances at 224 Benefit Street and 20 North Main Street in Providence, RI
For more information, call 401 454-6500 or visit risdmuseum.org.
Ages: All ages
Cost: FREE

Artists often represent places they know well. Tony Capellan's Mar Caribe is inspired by the coast of the Caribbean Sea and his home in the Dominican Republic. The many sandals in varied shades of blue suggest the ocean and wearing flip-flops on the beach. Tony Capellan collected these sandals and arranged them to create this sculpture.

Tony Capellan Mar Caribe
Installation View, Tony Capellan, Mar Caribe (Caribbean Sea), 1996. Mary B Jackson Fund.
Courtesy of Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design.

With your child: Look closely. Is there something unexpected? The place where you would slide your feet is made of barbed wire, which is unexpected. The artist took familiar everyday objects and transformed their appearance to share his ideas about a specific place.

Project: Find everyday objects that are all the same color or shape in your house and create your own sculpture.

ARTplay is a monthly column from the RISD Museum of Art in which various themes and activities introduce kids and parents to the museum’s collection both online and off. Each month, Kidoinfo will help spark your children’s interest in art, encouraging them to learn about different works at the museum. To learn more about the collection or see the art in person, visit the Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, located at 20 N. Main Street, Providence, RI.

All additional inquires or requests should be directed to: Denise Bastien, Collection Information and Imaging Specialist, Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, 224 Benefit Street, Providence, RI 02903. 401 454- 6528. E-mail inquires to: rightsrepro@risd.edu

April 24, 11-4pm at The RISD Museum. Details listed below.

The Big Draw was first established in 2000 in the United Kingdom by the Campaign for Drawing, an arts organization that promotes drawing as an important and exciting tool to help people of all ages see, think, invent, and learn. It has has one aim: to get everyone drawing! Why? Drawing helps us to think, invent and communicate — regardless of age and ability.

The Big Draw

Annually over 1,500 venues, from village halls and nursery schools to national museums and castles, take part in the The Big Draw. This annual month-long season spans art, science, design and the environment. It connects generations and communities. Big Draw events show that drawing can be an enjoyable public activity as well as a private passion.

Prior to Big Draw Providence, Eileen Adams, the director of the Campaign for Drawing, led a sold-out one-day workshop for local teachers, educa­tors, and community leaders which focused on how draw­ing can stimulate learning and creativity and serve as a medium in developing the skills of perception, communication, and invention. Workshop participants explored the possibilities of different drawing techniques and learned ways to use drawing within their own organizations, which include Artists Exchange, City Year, Gordon School, Jacqueline Walsh School for the Performing Arts, Pawtucket Arts Collaborative, Steelyard, the Hive Archive, Top Drawer, and United Cerebral Palsy, among others.

The Big Draw at the RISD Museum is a celebration of drawing for all.  Bring your imagination and come make your mark! There will be drawing activities on the walls, in the galleries, and beyond. Let your drawing come out of the box. After making your mark in the museum, experience a collaborative performance by the youth dance troupe JUMP! and Lynne Harlow, explore the litany of lines in Pat Steir’s work or draw from puffer fish and ferns in the RISD Nature Lab.

The Details:

The Big Draw
The RISD Museum - 224 Benefit Street, Providence, Rhode Island
(401) 454-6500
website:  http://www.risdmuseum.org/

Schedule:

11-4pm

- Drawing on the Walls:  Who says you can’t draw on the walls? Join us for drawing exercises that explore the physical space around you.

- Take it to the Floor:  Let the museum be your muse. Explore the galleries through the eyes of an artist and make your own response to the lines, dots, and dashes that bring a work of art to life.

- Be a naturalist:  Drawing from models helps artists develop their eye for observation and detail — at the RISD Nature Lab, our models range from furry and winged, to the poisonous and slimy.

2pm
- PostScript:  Visual artist Lynne Harlow and JUMP! Dance Company will present Postscript, a performance exploring the intersection of drawing and dance.

1 + 3pm
- Drawing out of Line: Join us for an introduction to the exhibition Pat Steir: Drawing Out of Line and explore how the artist challenges the notion of drawing in scale and ambition.

This Free event is for all ages. Food and refreshments provided throughout the day by Tim Hortons. Support for The Big Draw is provided in part by the Providence Tourism Council and Tim Hortons.

With your child: What objects make up the head, back, seat, and legs of this chair?  There is a compass, pencil, paper, and ruler.  These are some of the tools of an architect.  This chair is called a Valet Chair because you could hang your coat from the pegs at the top of the compass and then take a seat.  The designer is a professor at RISD.  He creates furniture that looks like sculpture.

RISDM-ChairAlphonse Mattia, Architect's Valet Chair, 1989. Museum purchase with Funds from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Courtesy of Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design.

Project 1: Look at the chairs in your home, at school, or in a theater. What do they look like? Look at the size, shape, color, and materials. How are they similar to or different from the architect’s chair?

Project 2: Design your own chair on paper or make a model using legos, boxes, pillows, etc. Give your chair a name. What would it be used for? What would it be made of?

ARTplay is a monthly column from the RISD Museum of Art in which various themes and activities introduce kids and parents to the museum’s collection both online and off. Each month, Kidoinfo will help spark your children’s interest in art, encouraging them to learn about different works at the museum. To learn more about the collection or see the art in person, visit the Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, located at 20 N. Main Street, Providence, RI.

All additional inquires or requests should be directed to: Denise Bastien, Collection Information and Imaging Specialist, Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, 224 Benefit Street, Providence, RI 02903. 401 454- 6528. E-mail inquires to: rightsrepro@risd.edu

Artists create portraits for many reasons. They can depict what a person looks like and also reveal their profession, status, identity. Every detail in this painting is intended to tell us that this is a young woman from a royal family. She stands between palm and laurel trees on a grassy terrace above an enclosed garden. Her dress would have been considered very fashionable in her time and is decorated with pearls, gold, and silver embroidery.

RISDM-Woman

English, Active early 17th Century Portrait of a young Women, possibly of the Hampden Family, ca 1610. Gift of Miss Lucy Aldrich. Courtesy of Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design.


With your child:
Have you ever sat for a portrait? Perhaps you have had your picture taken at school. Did you do anything special to prepare?

Project:
Prepare yourself for an imaginary self-portrait. Dress up in costume. Place a mirror in front of you. Copy how you look using crayons, markers, or pencils. Will someone recognize your facial features? Will they be able to identify who you are pretending to be?

ARTplay is a monthly column from the RISD Museum of Art in which various themes and activities introduce kids and parents to the museum’s collection both online and off. Each month, Kidoinfo will help spark your children’s interest in art, encouraging them to learn about different works at the museum. To learn more about the collection or see the art in person, visit the Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, located at 20 N. Main Street, Providence, RI.

All additional inquires or requests should be directed to: Denise Bastien, Collection Information and Imaging Specialist, Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, 224 Benefit Street, Providence, RI 02903. 401 454- 6528. E-mail inquires to: rightsrepro@risd.edu

DeKooning - Black and White

Willem de Kooning, Black and White Abstraction, ca 1950. Museum Works of Art Fund. Courtesy of The Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design.

Willem de Kooning used a large brush that could hold a lot of paint to create this work. Rather than create an image of something or someplace, he was interested in the act of creating the image and lines created by the gesture of his hand holding a paintbrush.

With your child: Can you figure out where de Kooning started each of his lines and where they ended?

Project 1: With your finger, follow a line from where it begins to its end. How many different types of lines can you find? Can you discover any shapes?

Project 2: Try some line exercises:
- Draw a portrait of a person without lifting your pencil off the paper.
- Draw a picture of an animal using only straight lines.
- Draw for 30 seconds without stopping.

ARTplay is a monthly column from the RISD Museum of Art in which various themes and activities introduce kids and parents to the museum’s collection both online and off. Each month, Kidoinfo will help spark your children’s interest in art, encouraging them to learn about different works at the museum. To learn more about the collection or see the art in person, visit the Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, located at 20 N. Main Street, Providence, RI.

All additional inquires or requests should be directed to: Denise Bastien, Collection Information and Imaging Specialist, Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, 224 Benefit Street, Providence, RI 02903. 401 454- 6528. E-mail inquires to: rightsrepro@risd.edu

With your child: The six towers of this sculpture are taller than most grown-ups. They are made up of many identical open cubes stacked together. Sol LeWitt created works of art like this one by writing a set of rules or instructions that other people could follow. He said, "The idea becomes the machine that makes the art," and he believed that the concept or idea behind a work of art is as important as the finished piece. Therefore the artist could provide the idea or instructions for the work of art and someone else could draw or build it.

Sol LeWitt Siz TowersSol Le Witt, Six Towers, 1987. Purchased in honor of Philip M. Johnston, Director of the
Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, 1998-2003 and Helen M. Danforth Acquisition
Fund, ©Sol Le Witt Estate, Courtsey of Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Project 1: Create your own Sol LeWitt. Use a black crayon, ruler, and paper to make a drawing according to these instructions from LeWitt's portfolio WORK FROM INSTRUCTIONS (1971):

USING A BLACK, HARD CRAYON, DRAW A TWENTY-INCH SQUARE.
DIVIDE THIS SQUARE INTO ONE-INCH SQUARES. WITHIN EACH
ONE-INCH SQUARE, DRAW NOTHING, OR DRAW A DIAGONAL
STRAIGHT LINE FROM CORNER TO CORNER OR TWO CROSSING
STRAIGHT LINES DIAGONALLY FROM CORNER TO CORNER.

Project 2: Write your own set of rules and let someone else follow the instructions to make the art.

ARTplay is a monthly column from the RISD Museum of Art in which various themes and activities introduce kids and parents to the museum’s collection both online and off. Each month, Kidoinfo will help spark your children’s interest in art, encouraging them to learn about different works at the museum. To learn more about the collection or see the art in person, visit the Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, located at 20 N. Main Street, Providence, RI.

Additional inquires or requests should be directed to: Denise Bastien, Collection Information and Imaging Specialist, Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, 224 Benefit Street, Providence, RI 02903. 401 454- 6528. E-mail inquires to: rightsrepro@risd.edu

I am pleased to bring back the RISD ARTplay series. These monthly posts from the RISD Museum are designed to engage you and your child with art. Allowing young children to discover and experience the art freely at their level is important to their creative development. ARTplay is not about finished projects. This is a launching pad–creating a space for visual dialog with your child. Talk about the art with your child, ask them questions, introduce the projects, allow them to explore and interpret the suggestions in their own way, or plan visits to see the art in person at the museum.  Who knows where it will lead .  . .

Rather than painting in his studio and imagining a beautiful sunny day in the country, Claude Monet often took his paint, canvas and easel into the country and painted what he saw. He wanted to catch the particular moment before him, the time of day, light, and color.

RISD-Claude Monet

Claude Monet, A Walk in the Fields at Argenteuil, 1873. Promised gift,
Courtesy of Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design.

With your child: How would you describe Monet's walk in the fields of Argenteuil? What time of year is it? What time of day? How would you describe the weather?

Project: Download the postcard template here to create your own landscape. Take paper and color pencils with you outside and use the blank side to record what you see. Try to capture the time of day, weather, and light. Send your landscape to a friend and see if they can guess where and when you were.

ARTplay is a monthly column from the RISD Museum of Art in which various themes and activities introduce kids and parents to the museum’s collection both online and off. To learn more about the collection or see the art in person, visit Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, located at 20 N. Main Street, Providence, RI.

This months Free-for-All Saturday at RISD Museum celebrates the grand opening of The Chace Center. Saturday, September 26 is an all-day (and evening) admission-free party to welcome visitors of every age. Opportunities abound to view new exhibitions (including Chihuly at RISD and Building Books: The Art of David Macaulay), watch family-friendly performances, participate in hands-on activities, and enjoy live music. Visit the museum website for a complete schedule. Contributing writer Laurel McLaughlin reviews the Chihuly at RISD show for Kidoinfo. She will review Building Books: The Art of David Macaulay show in a future post.

Chihuly 080810 03I’ll admit it, when I first thought about visiting the Dale Chihuly show at the new Chace Center at the RISD Museum, all I could envision was my two-year-old tearing through the gallery space while I followed, horror-stricken. It played out like one of those Curious George stories where the little monkey has brought about some sort of hideous and expensive devastation and the whole town ends up chasing after him. So, when I recently attended the media preview of the show (without kids) I was thinking of this; Is it possible to enjoy these exquisite and highly fragile masterpieces with children in tow? The answer is yes (see tips below)–this show is pure magic and none of us should miss this opportunity to enjoy great art.

The first thing that awaits you is the Persian Chandelier. Like most of Chihuly’s work, this was created specifically for the RISD venue. You move beneath a profusion of multihued glass forms illuminated meticulously to allow gentle, colored light to filter onto the wall. An intriguing aspect of his work is how Chihuly succeeds in defying the properties of his medium. The liveliness of the color and form suggests movement and growth, which we usually don’t associate with glass. Also, the scale of the installation merges the art with the viewer’s physical space.

Chihuly 080810 08

Chihuly’s drawings form a grid across the next wall. As with the glass objects, the artist uses heat, color and a bit of serendipity to create these lively compositions. They seem almost to have formed themselves. He uses paintbrushes, brooms and squirt bottles to apply the paint and there is an amazing sense of joy and vigorous energy to them. I might ask my girls how they think the artist feels as he’s making these works. I know they’ll be thrilled to learn that all of his shoes are covered with paint.

Chihuly 080810 10-1

Beyond the drawings to your left is the Mille Fiori installation. The gallery walls (specially designed for this exhibit) were built in a circular form around a garden of swirling and rounded shapes. The darker palette lends a quieter, meditative feeling to the work. Chihuly often says that he’s never met a color he doesn’t like, and each one of the installations at the museum invokes a slightly different mood as a result of this variety. I’m curious to hear how my kids might respond to each color palette and how they will choose to describe them.
(more…)

Bellowstanding4This month at Free For All Saturday, the RISD Museum celebrates all the changes and renovations that have been happening at the museum. This is a program that lets you dream and build big! In workshops, team up on a "MiniCity" project or design a home interior. Learn all about the new Chace Center and sketch your own original building design, to be exhibited on the day of The Chace Center inauguration, September 27. Join the master of musical invention Leonard Solomon (and his Amazing Bellowphone!) for a lively performance as well.

Details:
When: 11am - 4pm
The Leonard Solomon performance is in the Main Gallery from 1 pm - 4 pm. If the weather permits, the performer will do a "pre-show" juggling act outside on the terrace of the Farago entrance at 12:30 pm.
Where: RISD Museum of Art, 224 Benefit Street, Providence 02906
Ages: 3 and up
Cost: Free
(401) 454-6530

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