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42cf4404-bd31-4cfe-81d7-d1a0b3d75e59Welcome Spring! Edible Rhody KIDS is created in collaboration with Edible Rhody magazine. We love getting kids involved with all things local! Food, farm life, recipes and produce for every season are all here to inspire our up-and-coming foodies to enjoy the bounty of Rhode Island.

This seasons’ topic is “Breakfast”. Hot or cold, the first meal is the most important of the day and gives us energy and brain power!  Make it count by dishing up something healthy, delicious and fun! Check out this beautifully poster (Download a printable version here.) illustrated by Jessica McGuirl. Find the ER spring issue online or available at local newsstands all over the state.
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Find delicious recipes and more ideas online. Just click on the chef’s hat at EdibleRhody.com

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eRhodyWinter2015coverWelcome Winter! Edible Rhody KIDS is created in collaboration with Edible Rhody magazine. We love getting kids involved with all things local! Food, farm life, recipes and produce for every season are all here to inspire our up-and-coming foodies to enjoy the bounty of Rhode Island.

This seasons’ topic, “Ramen”, shows us there is more to this Asian noodle meal than what comes prepacked from the grocery store. Check out how easy it is to make fresh delicious ramen at home! Find the ER winter issue online or available at local newsstands all over the state.
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We’ve got more delicious recipes online. Just click on the chef’s hat at EdibleRhody.com

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Welcome Summer! Edible Rhody KIDS is created in collaboration with Edible Rhody magazine. This seasons’ topic, “Ice Pops”, celebrates one of our favorite summer treats by sharing the origin story along withall natural yummy options that do not contain chemically-colored fruit flavored pops! Check out the ER summer issue online or available at local newsstands all over the state.77838_EdibRhod_I055

Ice Pops
Depending on size of mold, makes 6 ice pops

Toss cut fruit together in a bowl and then spoon into popsicle molds. Pour enough juice so it comes slightly below each rim. (Pops will expand a little as they freeze.) If you’re using paper cups, cover with aluminum foil (to hold sticks in place). Insert Popsicle sticks. Place on a tray in the freezer for 5 hours or overnight. Run under warm water for a few seconds to release pops from their molds. Enjoy!

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Screenshot 2015-07-16 16.13.59Ice Pop Molds

When making ice pops at home, you will need a container or mold to hold the liquid while it freezes and a stick to hold your frozen treat while you eat it!

Some store bought molds (like Zoku) even come with their own storage container.

Shop Local: Stock on Hope Street in Providence carries a variety of ice pop molds. StockPVD.com

HISTORY

Folks have been enjoying frozen syrupy treats since as far back as Ancient Roman times but it was not until 1905, when Frank Epperson, an 11-year-old boy from California, discovered the fun of eating this treat on a stick. He accidentally left a glass filled with water, powdered soda mix and a wooden stirring stick outside overnight, and it froze. Voila-the Popsicle was born!

freeze pop
paleta
Popsicle
ice lolly
icy pole
Frozen Fruit Pops
United States
England
New Zealand
Ireland
Mexico

 

We’ve got more delicious recipes online for fresh fruit ice pops. Just click on the chef’s hat at EdibleRhody.com

Welcome Spring! Edible Rhody KIDS is created in collaboration with Edible Rhody magazine. This seasons’ topic, “Fair Trade Means Fair Business for Farmers”, makes us think about the people behind the food we eat. What are their lives like? Do they get paid enough to live a decent life healthy life? Learn what Fair Trade certified means and how we play a part in the food chain. - See more at: http://kidoinfo.com/edible-rhody-kids-fair-trade-means-fair-business-for-farmers-spring-2014/#sthash.lkMle0E6.dpuf
Welcome Spring! Edible Rhody KIDS is created in collaboration with Edible Rhody magazine. This seasons’ topic, “Fair Trade Means Fair Business for Farmers”, makes us think about the people behind the food we eat. What are their lives like? Do they get paid enough to live a decent life healthy life? Learn what Fair Trade certified means and how we play a part in the food chain. - See more at: http://kidoinfo.com/edible-rhody-kids-fair-trade-means-fair-business-for-farmers-spring-2014/#sthash.lkMle0E6.dpuf

Screenshot 2015-04-30 08.38.17Welcome Spring! Edible Rhody KIDS is created in collaboration with Edible Rhody magazine. This seasons’ topic, “Spring Chicks”, celebrates these adorable little furry friends! Check out the ER summer issue online or available at local newsstands all over the state.

Fun Facts About the Rhode Island Red:

76309_EdibRhod_I032Local Event: Rhode Island Red Annual Chick Hatch
July 4, 2015
South County Museum - 100 Strath more St., Narragansett, Rl
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“Old-Type,” heritage-breed Rhode Island Red, pay a visit to Living History Farm at the South County Museum in Narragansett. it hosts the annual Independence Day Chick Hatch where children of all ages can watch eggs hatch and hold the fuzzy little baby chicks.

Local Book: R is for Rhode Island Red: A Rhode Island Alphabet
by Mark R. Allio
Illustrated by Mary Jane Begin
Discover the wonders of the Ocean State letter by letter.

chefhathomeGet kids cooking!

We’ve got a delicious recipe online for a cheddar cheese omelet. Just click on the chef’s hat at EdibleRhody.com.

Visit Edible Rhody KIDS for more spring chick fun including recipes and a word sort!

 

73373_EdibRhod_I042Welcome Fall! Edible Rhody KIDS is created in collaboration with Edible Rhody magazine. This seasons’ topic, “Apples”, celebrates this delicious fall fruit in all its many shapes, sizes and colors! Check out the ER fall issue online or available at local newsstands all over the state.

Why we LOVE apples!

• Super yummy!
• Easy snack to pack—no utensils needed!
• Full of healthy nutrients to make your mind and body strong!
• There are 7,500 varieties (different kinds) of apples grown throughout the world.
• It takes about 36 apples to create one gallon of apple cider.
• Apples are a member of the rose family.
• Apples come in shades of red, green and yellow.
• Eat the peel too! Apple peels are loaded with fiber and vitamins A and C.

Homemade Applesauce

Homemade applesauce is delicious all by itself, with yogurt or on top of waffles, pancakes, ice cream, pork chops and more.

• Peel, core and cut apples into l-inch chunks.
• Combine apples with remaining ingredients in a large heavy-bottomed saucepan. Cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until apples are quite soft (about 25 minutes). Allow to cool before proceeding.
• Carefully puree using a food mill or a food processor or blender. A potato masher works well too. Store applesauce up to 1 week in clean glass jars or containers in the refrigerator.

We’ve got more helpful tips and fun recipes online including applesauce parfaits and applesauce cake. Just click on the chef’s hat at Ediblerhody.com.

Pick your own: Visit the RI Fruit Growers website for a list of Pick Your Own orchards. RIFruitgrowers.org/pickyourown/

Welcome Spring! Edible Rhody KIDS is created in collaboration with Edible Rhody magazine. This seasons’ topic, “Fair Trade Means Fair Business for Farmers”, makes us think about the people behind the food we eat. What are their lives like? Do they get paid enough to live a decent life healthy life? Learn what Fair Trade certified means and how we play a part in the food chain. - See more at: http://kidoinfo.com/edible-rhody-kids-fair-trade-means-fair-business-for-farmers-spring-2014/#sthash.lkMle0E6.dpuf
Welcome Spring! Edible Rhody KIDS is created in collaboration with Edible Rhody magazine. This seasons’ topic, “Fair Trade Means Fair Business for Farmers”, makes us think about the people behind the food we eat. What are their lives like? Do they get paid enough to live a decent life healthy life? Learn what Fair Trade certified means and how we play a part in the food chain. - See more at: http://kidoinfo.com/edible-rhody-kids-fair-trade-means-fair-business-for-farmers-spring-2014/#sthash.lkMle0E6.dpuf

Edible Rhody Summer 2014Welcome Summer! Edible Rhody KIDS is created in collaboration with Edible Rhody magazine. This seasons’ topic, “Tomatoes”, celebrates this delicious summer fruit in all its many shapes, sizes and colors! Check out the ER summer issue online or available at local newsstands all over the state.

For many people, a fresh tomato is the perfect summer treat. Some like to eat their tomatoes the way you eat a whole apple, and in fact tomatoes were once referred to as “love apples.” Even if you don’t love to eat them whole, there are many ways to enjoy tomatoes in your favorite summer meals.Tomatoes_Growing

Get kids cooking!

Summer Salsa

salsaAn easy way to use tomatoes is to make a fresh summer salsa. Be sure to ask for help from an adult when using a sharp knife
for chopping.

Combine all the ingredients in a bowl. If you are going to use jalapeño, be careful not to touch your eyes after chopping, and wear rubber gloves. Add a small amount at a time so your salsa doesn’t become too spicy for your taste buds. Let sit for an hour for the flavors to combine. Enjoy with tortilla chips, eggs or just plain with a spoon!

If your child is a bit "picky" about what they eat, we suggest reading one of our favorite picture books, I Will Never Not Ever Eat a Tomato, by Lauren Child to help your child see food (including tomatoes) in a whole new light.

Visit Edible Rhody KIDS for more tomatoe fun including recipes and a word sort!

 

RightColLayout 1Welcome Spring! Edible Rhody KIDS is created in collaboration with Edible Rhody magazine. This seasons’ topic, “Fair Trade Means Fair Business for Farmers”, makes us think about the people behind the food we eat. What are their lives like? Do they get paid enough to live a decent life healthy life? Learn what Fair Trade certified means and how we play a part in the food chain.

Have you ever thought about where that banana you had for breakfast comes from? What about the chocolate and sugar used to make that delicious cupcake? The people who grow these crops around the world should be paid fairly for their work and be treated well. Fair Trade makes sure they are.

Much of the food we eat every day is grown near the equator, at the warmest parts of the earth. This includes sugar, mangoes, coffee, chocolate, bananas and much more.

The people who plant and raise these crops are often paid very little in return–not enough to feed their children or to be able to send them to school or to a doctor. Sometimes kids are forced to work in the fields with dangerous chemicals that can make them sick.

Fair Trade is an international effort to connect farmers in developing countries with markets in the U.S. and Europe, places where they can sell their products at a fair price. It’s an important tool to help improve the living conditions of farming families.

Here’s a recipe for Fluffy Chocolate Mousse Torte.bottomBanana

 

Welcome Winter! Edible Rhody KIDS is created in collaboration with Edible Rhody magazine. This seasons’ topic, “Got Local Milk?”, explains how our milk gets from the farm to our fridge plus a list of local milk suppliers and an easy milk recipe.

Edible Rhody  Kids winter 2013-2014

 

chefhathomeTry this yummy drink! Maple Milk

Mix 1 teaspoon of maple syrup into an 8-ounce glass of milk.
Tip:Buy local maple syrup!

Rhode Island Dairies

 

E_RHO_Fall13_COVER Welcome Fall! Edible Rhody KIDS is created in collaboration with Edible Rhody magazine. This seasons’ topic, “Be a locavore hero!”, shares what it means to eat local, how you can take action and design your food plate from the seasonal bounty this autumn!

lo·ca·vore noun \ılō-kə-ıvôr\

definition : one who eats foods grown locally whenever possible
origin : local + -vore (as in carnivore)
first known use: 2005

CRANBERRIES.100What's on your locavore plate?

Rhode Island is home to a wide variety of food options all year long. Design your food plate from the seasonal bounty this autumn!

Take the “100-mile meal” challenge!

See if you can eat 1 meal a week where everything on your plate comes from within 100 miles of where you live. It’s OK to make a few exceptions for things like cooking oil, our and spices! what’s grown - veggies, fruit what’s raised - meat, poultry, eggs what’s caught - seafood what’s made - cheeses, breads, maple syrup

TAKE ACTION!
1. Plan meals. A healthy balanced meal includes fruits, vegetables, grains, proteins.
2. Eat fresh and in season. Avoid “fast” or overly processed foods.
3. Food shop with your family from grocers who oer local foods, at farmers’ markets, join a CSA.
4. Do the local lunch box challenge and take a locavore lunch to school every week.

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Resources + Books
Pick-Your-Own-Chart

ERK_SUM_2013_COVERWelcome Summer! Edible Rhody KIDS is created in collaboration with Edible Rhody magazine. Grab this season’s copy of Edible Rhody, available at various locations around Rhode Island. This seasons’ topic, “Pick Your Own”, shares a chart of when to pick your favorite fruits, a how-to guide for creating your own smoothie recipe along with a Rhode Island scavenger hunt and books to read.

Make your own Smoothie

Select at least one liquid and one fruit. Experiment with flavors and name your favorite combos.

LIQUID
Choose 1—2 cups of liquid:ERK_SUM_2013

FRUIT
Add ¼ cup (or to taste) of 1 or more of the following fruits:

Tip: Using pre-frozen berries will add a nice chill to your smoothie. (Wash and dry fresh-picked fruit and place in freezer bags to enjoy local smoothies all year long!)Rev your engines! Place ingredients in an electric blender and place the lid on tight. Blend until smooth.


How do you like to eat your favorite fruits?
Did You Know?
coverRhode Island fruit growers raise over 19 types of fruit. When you buy locally grown fruits in season you’ll taste the freshness!Every Rhode Islander lives within 15 minutes of a working farm. Many of those farms grow your favorite fruits in season and some invite you to pick
your own.
Play the Rhode Island Farm Scavenger Hunt
Take a road trip and explore 28 of Rhode Island’s 1,200 working farms. Visit RIFruitGrowers.org to download the map and clues or pick up a pamphlet at a participating farm.
Resources + Books

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